A guide to fingering styles on Yamaha Tyros 5

There are a number of different ways that you can control the auto-accompaniments on the Yamaha Tyros, during our latest Tyros meeting here in our shop we covered this topic and gave out the following information to all the people that attended, hopefully you will find it a useful guide too.

Firstly, I should say that to access the screen that allows you to change the fingering mode you press ‘direct access’ and then the ‘acmp’ button, the section you need will be located on the bottom left of the screen.

Single finger mode:

The easiest way to play the keyboard and certainly the one that requires the least amount of input.

With one single finger you can play ALL major chords.

If you want to hear a C chord you simply play the C note alone (we call this the ‘root’ note) and the keyboard will automatically play the remaining notes in the chord. You simply repeat the above for any other chord you want to play.

There are of course other types of chord which are very important, for example minor chords, but it is made so easy to do. To play a minor chord you have to play the root note and then add the nearest black note on the left.

Eg: If you want to play a C minor (Cm) then you would play C and the Bb to it’s left.

Or, if you wanted to play an F minor (Fm) then you would play the F and the Eb key, easy!

The other type of chord you can play using single finger mode is the seventh chord, and again it’s made very easy to do. All you have to do it play the root note but this time add the nearest white note to the left.

Eg: If you want to play a C seventh (C7) then you would play C and the B to it’s left.

Or, if you wanted to play an F seventh (F7) then you would play the F and the E key, easy!

Finally, there is one other variation you can do with single finger mode and that is a combination of the above; a minor seventh chord. (eg; Am7)

To achieve this you simply play the root note and the nearest black and white notes to the left.

Eg: If you want to play a C minor seventh (Cm7) then you would play C, the B to it’s left and also the Bb.

Or, if you want to play a F minor seventh (Fm7) then you would play F, the E to it’s left and also the Eb.

So, Single finger mode gives you four chord types; Major, minor, seventh and minor seventh and with these few chords you can play literally hundreds of songs very well without having to learn any complicated chord patterns or inversions using your left hand.

Fingered mode:

You MUST play at least three notes to produce a chord but these notes can be whatever you choose so all variations are possible. You cannot play a single fingered chord.

Finger on bass mode:

This is a very clever setting that allows you to have more control of the bass note in the style. For example in ‘Whiter shade of pale’ there is a very familiar rolling bass line, which if you use any other fingering style will not quite sound right because the bass note remains playing only the root note. You still have to play at least three notes to generate a chord and you cannot play a single fingered chord.

Multi fingered mode:

This is probably the most commonly used fingering mode as you can play all chord variations and are not limited to just four like in single fingered mode. Most Yamaha keyboards and Clavinovas are set to this by default.

The reason it is so popular is because you can still play using the single fingered method and produce the same result as if it was set to single fingered but you can also switch to playing the complete chord at anytime if you know it.

A.I. fingered mode:

The A.I. stands for ‘Artificial Intelligence’ – that’s to say the keyboard is using its computer power to try and help you produce a better performance by reading what you’re playing and trying to anticipate what you want to come next, this works especially well if you want to have more control over the bass line but don’t want to use the awkward chord inversions required when set to fingered on bass.

Eg; If you play a complete chord then play the single root note and the next note down the bass note will follow eg; play a complete C chord then just play the C and the B below then the C and the Bb and the bass line will follow you whilst the C chord continues to play.

There is also a nice little trick if you hold down three adjacent keys where you can have the entire accompaniment halt except the drums, which is a great way to vary the performance, you can then play a note to the left of this and the bass will join in again (although this gets a bit tricky!) then you can play a normal chord and carry on.

Full keyboard mode:

This mode allows you to play a little more like a traditional pianist would, instead of there being a split point on the left where your chord control is, the accompaniment is triggered anywhere on the keyboard, so if you wanted to you can play a chord with your right hand and a single bass note on the left. As long a three notes of the chord are played somewhere on the keyboard it will trigger the accompaniment.

A.I. full keyboard mode:

This is a combination of full keyboard mode and AI fingered mode. The keyboard will try and anticipate what chord you want to play next particularly with a rolling bass line. Admittedly this does cause some problems occasionally when it doesn’t play the chord you wanted.

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